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Slower Salsa Songs
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Kimberlita



Joined: 09 Oct 2006
Posts: 372
Location: Downtown

PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2007 10:21 am    Post subject: Slower Salsa Songs Reply with quote

Hey guys... I was wondering if anyone could recommend some nice SLOWER paced salsa songs? I'm not really good with song names, so I don't know what to look for. I can only tell by hearing the songs.

Any recommendations would be really appreciated!
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AnthonyF



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 45
Location: Scarborough

PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2007 11:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's a link for imeem.com. I have these songs if you want, I can send it to you.

Todo De Ti (by DLG)
http://quiencontrami.imeem.com/music/yJiIBAdX/todo_de_ti/

No Me Ames (Marc Anthony & Jennifer Lopez)
http://jbr15zzz.imeem.com/music/3_NKXaV8/no_me_ames/
(sorry I can't find the salsa version of this song on the net, but I have a copy in my laptop)

In search for slower salsa songs, I found out they're called "salsa romantica". Here's the wikipedia page, and in it has a list of songs and artists.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salsa_romantica
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Kimberlita



Joined: 09 Oct 2006
Posts: 372
Location: Downtown

PostPosted: Wed Aug 15, 2007 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks a lot Anthony! You are awesome!
All I needed were some song titles, so as long as I have them, I can try to find the songs myself.
I really appreciate your input and your help Smile
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Miguel Angel



Joined: 29 Jul 2007
Posts: 1
Location: Downtown

PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 11:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi there!

I heard that these are slow, but I'm not sure Smile

Track Title - Performing Artist(s)

Tu y yo - Cheito
Linda guajira - Roberto Torres
El sol de buscaja - Yuri Buenaventura
Grog moin - Africando
Oye como va - Fruko y Sus Tesos
La tuna - Los Warawako
Fethial sama khol - Africando
Maravilla de son - La Conexión
Lluvia de tu cielo - Rubén Blades & Willie Colón
Camina y prende el fogon - Grupo Raison
Felicidad - Gloria Estefan
Yamulemao - Joe Arroyo y La Verdad
Ven devorame otra vez - Antonio Da Costa
Hablame - Carangano y Jose Luis Garcia
Lindas y bellas - Los Nemus del Pacifico
Me basta con tu sonrisa - Orquesta Guayacan
Duele - Mimi Ibarra
No vale la pena - Ray Sepulveda y Johnny Rivera
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Kimberlita



Joined: 09 Oct 2006
Posts: 372
Location: Downtown

PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 2007 10:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks a lot Miguel! I will definitely look for those songs and give them a try Smile
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KT



Joined: 09 Oct 2006
Posts: 192
Location: Toronto

PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2007 6:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Slow salsa songs are so sexy and sensual to dance to! My personal selections would be some English salsa songs like "Lady" and "Thinking of You"

Happy slow salsa dancing Very Happy
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timbero1



Joined: 09 Jan 2007
Posts: 63

PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 12:09 pm    Post subject: slow salsa songs Reply with quote

I am convinced Lady is the worst salsa song ever made in the history of salsa. It is almost as bad as the salsa version of Carless Whisper by Wham. It is not music for dancing. It is made for supermarkets and elevators. It is not the sound of salsa, but rather the sound of someone trying to make some money off North American salseros. It is like nails on the blackboard for me. I am not against salsa music in English. For example, the album where Sergio George made salsa songs out of Beatles´s songs is pretty good. But salsa in other languages has to have some musical value for me, more than the fact it is in English.

It also proves my theory that most people in North America will only listen to a few songs that are in a different language. If you don´t know even a word in Spanish, how can you look up the name of the group or the names of the songs ? The words in most salsa songs (since they are not in English) will not resound with most North Americans. Therefore, North Americans salsa and ballroom dancers will prefer songs in English with a Latin beat. Since the lyrics have no importance, salsa dancers increasingly prefer faster and faster, purely instrumental songs without any singing involved. This is the Globalization of salsa and dance, which tries to make popular for everybody in every nation and culture, but strips it off any connection to a specific people and place. People in Singapore, New York, Toronto, Melbourne and even Mexico dance the same and listen to the same bland music.

For slow salsa, try Issac Delgado´s music from before. (Not the music he made after leaving Cuba where he is trying to be the next Ricky Martin). Delgado is an actual salsa singer, not like Marc Anthony (who feels more comfortable in pop or house music).
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Kimberlita



Joined: 09 Oct 2006
Posts: 372
Location: Downtown

PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for your suggestion, Timbero, I will check out Issac Delgado.

I think you make an overly negative generalization about North Americans. Yes, salsa did not originate here, nor in Singapore, or New York or Amstradam. What has happened is cultural appropriation. Where one learns something from one culture and adopts, appropriates and creates something uniquely on their own. Of course it changes. You can't help but bring your background experience into anything you take on.
No one is claiming to be authentic, but that doesn't mean that the experience isn't appreciated. We live in Canada... a global diaspora. Nothing is "authentic" here, becuase everyone comes from somewhere.

Salsa itself is a mixture of African and Spanish influence. Cuba, a mixed country (African, spanish, indiginous, etc) was the birthplace of a mixed dance.
Salsa means sauce... a sauce is a mixture, a melting pot of ingredients. A sauce changes region to region but it doesn't mean it isn't sauce. Salsa changes as it is exported from country to country, each country adding it's own flavor by bringing in past experience and dance styles. Salsa doesn't live in a vacuum. IT is danced by people who are as diverse as the rainbow. It's people the bring the dance to life. Without people, salsa is not a dance or a song, it's an empty index to which no meaning is attached. IT's even more closed minded to insist that something like salsa can be danced only one "authentic" way. Remember the roots from where it came. A mixed country. How "pure" is that?
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KT



Joined: 09 Oct 2006
Posts: 192
Location: Toronto

PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 6:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well said, Kim! Couldn't have said it better myself.

Just a reminder, as always, please keep posts positive, informative, and respectful to all.
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AMR



Joined: 08 Nov 2006
Posts: 16

PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2007 2:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Awesome reply Kim! I completely agree with you. It'd sure be nice if people would stop being judgemental about dancing and music and just go out and enjoy themselves. I happen to love the Lady remix because it reminds me of two of my favourite things: nostaglia and salsa dancing. But to each his own... if you don't like it, don't dance to it, but don't be so quick to judge others.
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MissChievous



Joined: 09 Oct 2006
Posts: 107
Location: North York

PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2007 10:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent answer Kimberlita, I second every word.

I would like to remind Timbero, yet again, to keep the posts respectful to our diverse community.
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timbero1



Joined: 09 Jan 2007
Posts: 63

PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2007 1:30 pm    Post subject: yes to diversity of opinions Reply with quote

I am not trying to be negative, but trying to expose people to different points of view. I would hope your diverse audience would also include people who learned to dance salsa in Latin America and speak Spanish as their first language. I would say most Cubans and Latin people living in Latin America would agree with me.

You are right. Cuba is a mixed country and salsa comes from the collision of European and African music (however, there are practically no indigenous people left in Cuba and no indigenous influence in salsa music or dance. I think you are confusing Central or South America with Cuba. A common mistake among Canadians.) The elements of Cuban music came from other countries, but Cuba is where it all came together and developed. You can dance salsa to the Buena Vista Social Club. Can you with do this with any traditional European or African music group?

On other hand, Lady is the same salsa we know made into the background pitter patter by a machine. The song Lady is a collision between one music producer, Lionel Richie, pre- recorded salsa music and an empty wallet. There is nothing new or innovative about this song. This song is from Los Angeles. What innovations or changes did it take from this environment? It would have been interesting if they put West Coast Hip Hop in it. Music in English is very popular in Latin America, why has nobody heard of this song in Latin America?

You say ALL salsa music and dance in other countries evolve. Is there something called Canadian style salsa dancing? Do salsa bands in Toronto have salsa hits all over the world? Do salsa teachers from New York or LA come specifically to learn from Toronto salsa teachers? No. No. And no. Most salsa teachers learn New York and LA styles and salsa bands here play salsa cover songs from other countries.

Of course, this doesn’t mean that it can’t happen. For example, salsa dancing from Cali, Colombia (notice the “o” instead of “u”), especially the footwork, looks very different from other kinds of salsa dancing. Most people in Cali can dance salsa and the best salsa groups enjoyed fame and financial security to develop their own music.

But look at the facts. Most Canadians have never seen salsa dancing or can recognize salsa music. No salsa song in Canada has ever made it the top ten. Salsa music musicians in Canada have to struggle to survive. People say salsa is popular in Toronto, but less than a few hundred go regularly go to salsa clubs. Out of these dancers, very very few would actually pay for a salsa CD or song. There is no infrastructure, no market, no history, no popular support or will and not enough PEOPLE for salsa innovation.

In Cuba, there are more salsa bands than other country. The best salsa groups and singers in Cuba are stars and earn more than doctors. The elements for Cuban music may be mixed from other countries, but the very idea to put these together came from Cuba. Nothing indigenous to Europe or Africa sounds like Cuban music. This music was incubated and developed through rumba, mambo, cha cha cha, columbia, for over 100 years before they put the name salsa on it. They were doing cross body leads decades before New York style was even invented.

Does that mean Cuban salsa music and dance will always be the best? Of course not. In the 1970’s, the most innovative salsa came from New York. But these musicians were taught by Cubans and basically played 100% Cuban music before innovating the music. The music that North American salseros dance to is more than 30 years old. Just as important as New York salsa and dance has been Timba and Casino dancing in the 1990’s. Even now, Cuban music and dance occupy such a central position in salsa, you have to deal with it. No one can take you seriously unless you can play or dance better than Cubans, because that is where the action is at and it is standard other styles should measure themselves by, at least for now, but who know if it will change in the future. You can play baseball as well as you want, but if you ignore how the Major Leagues or how Americans play, no one will take you seriously.

Innovation can only exist if there is tradition. The true innovators have a clear idea of what happened before and are masters of the old style. A true North American innovator would be able to dance Cuban dancing very well but also add or change it. How can you innovate salsa if you can’t even dance to the clave, the rhythm of salsa? Most salseros in Toronto don’t know Cuban salsa dancing looks like, so how can they innovate it or make it evolve?

The Soviets and Scandinavians studied how Canadians played hockey before they beat us. Ice skating and the idea of hitting a puck / ball with a stick came from other countries, but nobody would doubt ice hockey is Canadian. Even now, the best hockey players in the world come to the NHL, where most of the players and coaches are Canadian.
Salsa music and dance evolves and changes. Even in Cuba, people dance salsa very differently than even 20 years ago. However, just because you put a popular English song to a salsa beat doesn’t mean you innovate the music. Likewise, if you are Korean and you put a Tae Kwon Do move in your salsa dancing, this doesn’t make the dance evolve, especially if you are not dancing on 1 or 2, but on 1 and a half (off any beat). An innovation might be making a new cross body lead or dancing on 3 or 4. I mean really changing how the dance relates to the music.

Many people from different cultures dance salsa in Toronto. And that’s great, but most people don’t even know their own culture – forget about putting it into their salsa dancing. If a person from India learns to dance salsa, are you saying he can’t help but bring thousands of years of Hindu culture to his salsa dancing? Where is the Confucian influence in Chinese peoples’ mambo step and shines? This might be actually interesting if somebody could pull it off. However, these people who come from a rainbow of different cultures dance pretty much the same in Toronto. Why ? Although people come from backgrounds and cultures, we are dominated by one popular culture, American pop culture created by marketing teams. What we know about dancing comes from American TV shows, movies and music videos. Therefore, a Chinese-Canadian is more likely to put elements of Austin Powers in his dancing than Chinese opera any day. Of course, to add variety, this popular culture may do the “ethnic” thing for example when a fashion show goes “Bollywood” or Hollywood supposedly makes a movie with “Cuban” music dance or music like Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights. Of course, portraying the culture authentically may not be commercial enough, so they rely on stereotypes, but unfortunately, people believe this as real.

Salsa is just a word to sell a product. It was originally meant to mean something that is even more mixed than you mentioned. Salsa was meant to include merengue, bachata, chachacha, etc, in short, all Latin tropical music. It wasn't meant to be reflective of the music, just ask Tito Puente or Celia Cruz. Also, as any chef will tell you, if you just put a lot of different ingredients in a salsa without any regard for how they react or taste together, it will taste like crap.
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lindiloo



Joined: 11 Oct 2006
Posts: 62

PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 9:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

timbero...I am very curious to see your dance moves...got any clips of yourself dancing?
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Kimberlita



Joined: 09 Oct 2006
Posts: 372
Location: Downtown

PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 11:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You have some valid points and maybe we could all learn a thing or two from you. We're having an outting this Sunday at Montana. My picture is posted up here. You can see who I am. Why don't you come by and introduce yourself to me? IT'd be great to put a face with these discussions, and possibly a dance.
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blackout1999



Joined: 01 Apr 2007
Posts: 121
Location: Toronto

PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 7:44 pm    Post subject: Guess who's back! Reply with quote

Yo! What is the deal, salsa people? It's been a while since I've been on the forum, Let's just say work has been extremely overwhelming to say the least. Anyways, I'm back! I was reading what Timbero had to say and he does make some valid points but I think this topic he keeps bringing up is old and done with and old just died! The last time I checked, salsa does have its roots and I definitely respect that to a huge level, but over the years, salsa is one of the few dances that I know of that has brought people together from all walks of life and culture. Whenever I go to a club, I see all kinds of people doing the one thing they love to do. That's what salsa means to me. I'm pretty sure there are others that agree with what I'm saying. I'll be seeng you on the dance floor.
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